We’re currently making substantial investments in our technology platform and our brand marketing strategy to enable our next stage of high growth. To make these endeavors possible, we’re on the hunt for people who are passionate about solving tough problems and are excited about the opportunity take on highly visible roles that will have an immediate impact on our business.
Charlotte – American's second-largest hub in terms of number of destinations and daily flights.[14] It is American's primary hub for the Southeastern United States.[14] About 42 million passengers fly through CLT on American every year, or about 115,000 people per day.[14] American has about 91% of the market share at CLT, making it the airport's largest airline.[14]
Los Angeles – The eighth-largest hub in terms of number of destinations and flights and American's hub for the West Coast.[21] About 16.5 million passengers fly through LAX on American every year, or about 45,000 people per day.[21] American has about 19% of the market share at LAX, making it the largest carrier at the airport.[21] LAX is American Airlines' primary Hawaiian and transpacific gateway.[21]
Airbnb has experienced a lot of growth over the years. Currently our design department consists of nearly a dozen functions and outcome teams. It became clear that we needed more systematic ways to guide and leverage our collective efforts. While we recognized these challenges within the company, I believe they are symptoms of larger software industry problems.

New York–JFK – The tenth-largest hub for American in terms of number of flights, the ninth-largest in number of destinations and American's secondary East Coast hub for international flights.[23] About 7 million passengers fly through JFK on American every year, or about 19,000 people per day.[23] American has about 12% of the market share at JFK, making it the third-largest carrier at the airport behind Delta and JetBlue.[23] Since 2017, American has been reducing its international operations at JFK, opting to expand its Philadelphia hub instead.[24][25] JFK also serves as a major connecting point for other Oneworld carriers.[26]
To help fund the site, the founders created special edition breakfast cereals, with presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain as the inspiration for "Obama O's" and "Cap'n McCains".[25] In two months, 800 boxes of cereal were sold at $40 each, which generated more than $30,000 for the company's incubation.[26][27] It also got the company noticed by computer programmer Paul Graham, who invited the founders to the January 2009 winter training session of his startup incubator, Y Combinator, which provided them with training and $20,000 in funding in exchange for a small interest in the company.[18][28][29] With the website already built, they used the $20,000 Y-Combinator investment to fly to New York City to meet users and promote the site.[30] They returned to San Francisco with a profitable business model to present to West Coast investors. By March 2009, the site had 10,000 users and 2,500 listings.[29]
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