Domestic American Airline flights span from coast to coast, and include flights to Alaska, Hawaii, and several United States territories as well. Most American flights arrive and depart from one of several hubs located across the country. The largest hub, by far, is the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), which handles several hundred flights every day. Other hubs for American include Chicago's O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Miami International Airport (MIA), and New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). They also consider New York's LaGuardia Airport (LGA) as a focus city, with more flights on the schedule to more destinations than a typical city would have, for the benefit of business travelers looking for tickets into the Big Apple.

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The huge city of Dallas, set in northern Texas, boasts an infinitely intriguing history and eclectic, exciting mix of cultures. Once a big player in the cotton and oil industry, Dallas skyrocketed to become a major cultural and artistic hub, and today boasts a vast range of top galleries and performing arts centers. Dallas also has a strong musical heritage, which thrives in its live music venues and nightlife. Splurging shoppers and bargain-hunters will find that Dallas’ immense collection of malls provides a paradise.

Airbnb is an American home rental platform based in San Francisco that lets people list, find, and rent short-term lodging in 65,000 cities and more than 191 countries across the globe. Founded in 2008 by Brian Chesky, Joe Gebbia, and Nathan Blecharczyk, it has done more than any other company to change the way people find places to stay away from home. In recent years, Airbnb has evolved its peer-to-peer model to give hosts the tech tools they need to run a seamless, sophisticated operation. More than 40% of Airbnb listings are now available via Instant Book, allowing guests to make reservations much as they would a hotel booking, and a new check-in tool automatically feeds arrival instructions to them via the app. The company has also expanded into Business Travel Ready listings, which offer travelers a designated work space, guaranteed Wi-Fi, and more. Now valued at $31 billion, the company is also helping travelers explore the world outside their rentals. In 2016, Airbnb launched Trips, a service that lures travelers out of their rentals for local tours and adventures in 20 countries and 30 cities around the globe. And in an effort to address humanitarian issues, Airbnb launched an Open Homes program in 2017 that allows hosts to offer housing to refugees, displaced travelers, and those seeking shelter after disasters. 

In November 2012, Airbnb opened an office in Sydney, Australia, its 11th office location, and announced plans to launch the service in Thailand and Indonesia.[54] At that time, Australian consumers accounted for 10% of the Airbnb user base,[55] and in December that same year, Airbnb announced its strategy to move more aggressively into the Asian market with the launch of an office in Singapore.[56]
To help fund the site, the founders created special edition breakfast cereals, with presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain as the inspiration for "Obama O's" and "Cap'n McCains".[25] In two months, 800 boxes of cereal were sold at $40 each, which generated more than $30,000 for the company's incubation.[26][27] It also got the company noticed by computer programmer Paul Graham, who invited the founders to the January 2009 winter training session of his startup incubator, Y Combinator, which provided them with training and $20,000 in funding in exchange for a small interest in the company.[18][28][29] With the website already built, they used the $20,000 Y-Combinator investment to fly to New York City to meet users and promote the site.[30] They returned to San Francisco with a profitable business model to present to West Coast investors. By March 2009, the site had 10,000 users and 2,500 listings.[29]
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