Checked baggage must not exceed 62 linear inches and 50lbs. for Economy Class passengers. Baggage that exceeds the allowed size or weight will be subject to an excess baggage fee. Bags that are larger than 62 linear inches will cost $150-$200 each way based on destination. Fees for overweight baggage will be assessed based on total weight and range from $100-$450.
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American Airlines is one of the largest airlines in the world, with flights to over 250 destinations across the United States and around the globe. As an oneworld partner, passengers can enjoy travel on one ticket to over 800 destinations. Cheap American Airlines reservations can be found every day on Expedia, with offers for new discount fares loaded daily.
United Airlines Grows at Hubs: United Airlines tweaked its network over the weekend, and I found its moves at Los Angeles, where I live, to be the most interesting. A decade ago, United was one of Hollywood’s preferred airlines, and it flew to many of the largest markets for entertainment, as well as bigger Western cities. Now, it’s focused on smaller markets from L.A., including some unusual additions: Eugene, Oregon; Madison, Wisconsin; and Pasco/Tri-Cities, Washington. Ben Mutzabaugh of USA Today has details.
Charlotte – American's second-largest hub in terms of number of destinations and daily flights.[14] It is American's primary hub for the Southeastern United States.[14] About 42 million passengers fly through CLT on American every year, or about 115,000 people per day.[14] American has about 91% of the market share at CLT, making it the airport's largest airline.[14]

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American's early liveries varied widely, but a common livery was adopted in the 1930s, featuring an eagle painted on the fuselage.[67] The eagle became a symbol of the company and inspired the name of American Eagle Airlines. Propeller aircraft featured an international orange lightning bolt running down the length of the fuselage, which was replaced by a simpler orange stripe with the introduction of jets.
American Airlines baggage fees apply to specific itineraries and reflect the same policies as US Airways. The fees associated with checked bags are determined by the travel destinations, as some locations charge for all checked luggage, while others only charge for the second or additional checked baggage. Additionally, bags exceeding the size or weight guidelines may incur additional baggage fees.

Shortly after moving to San Francisco in October 2007, roommates and former schoolmates Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia could not afford the rent for their loft apartment. Chesky and Gebbia came up with the idea of putting an air mattress in their living room and turning it into a bed and breakfast.[16][17] The goal at first was just "to make a few bucks".[18][19] In February 2008, Nathan Blecharczyk, Chesky's former roommate, joined as the Chief Technology Officer and the third co-founder of the new venture, which they named AirBed & Breakfast.[17][20] They put together a website which offered short-term living quarters, breakfast, and a unique business networking opportunity for those who were unable to book a hotel in the saturated market.[21] The site Airbedandbreakfast.com officially launched on August 11, 2008.[22][23] The founders had their first customers in town in the summer of 2008, during the Industrial Design Conference held by Industrial Designers Society of America, where travelers had a hard time finding lodging in the city.[17][24]
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