Domestic American Airline flights span from coast to coast, and include flights to Alaska, Hawaii, and several United States territories as well. Most American flights arrive and depart from one of several hubs located across the country. The largest hub, by far, is the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), which handles several hundred flights every day. Other hubs for American include Chicago's O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Miami International Airport (MIA), and New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). They also consider New York's LaGuardia Airport (LGA) as a focus city, with more flights on the schedule to more destinations than a typical city would have, for the benefit of business travelers looking for tickets into the Big Apple.
*Savings based on all vacation package bookings with Flight + Hotel on Expedia.com from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017, as compared to price of the same components booked separately. Savings will vary based on origin/destination, length of trip, stay dates and selected travel supplier(s). Savings not available on all packages. For Free Flight or 100% Off Flight deals, package savings is greater than or equal to the current cost of one component, when both are priced separately.

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As of January 2018, the airline has had almost sixty aircraft hull losses due to all causes since the crash of an American Airways Ford 5-AT-C Trimotor in August 1931.[81][82] Of these most were propeller driven aircraft, including three Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprop aircraft (of which one, the crash in 1959 of Flight 320, resulted in fatalities).[82] Seventeen jet aircraft have been written off due to crashes – including Flight 587 in 2001, Flight 965 in 1995, Flight 191 in 1979, Flight 1 in 1962 and two aircraft destroyed in the September 11 attacks – and other accidents (such as the Flight 383 engine failure and fire in 2016); two of these were training flights in which only the crew were killed and six resulted in no fatalities.[82] Another four jet aircraft have been written off due to incidents while they were parked between flights or while undergoing maintenance.[82]


Violations occurring over a 4½ year period—from October 1993 to July 1998—targeted American Airlines for using high-sulfur fuel in motor vehicles at 10 major airports around the country. Under the federal Clean Air Act high sulfur fuel cannot be used in motor vehicles. American Airlines promptly identified and corrected these violations of the Clean Air Act.[79]
A year after Airbnb launched, the company decided to migrate nearly all of its cloud computing functions to Amazon Web Services (AWS) because of service administration challenges experienced with its original provider. Nathan Blecharczyk, Co-founder & CTO of Airbnb says, “Initially, the appeal of AWS was the ease of managing and customizing the stack. It was great to be able to ramp up more servers without having to contact anyone and without having minimum usage commitments. As our company continued to grow, so did our reliance on the AWS cloud and now, we’ve adopted almost all of the features AWS provides. AWS is the easy answer for any Internet business that wants to scale to the next level.”
New York–JFK – The tenth-largest hub for American in terms of number of flights, the ninth-largest in number of destinations and American's secondary East Coast hub for international flights.[23] About 7 million passengers fly through JFK on American every year, or about 19,000 people per day.[23] American has about 12% of the market share at JFK, making it the third-largest carrier at the airport behind Delta and JetBlue.[23] Since 2017, American has been reducing its international operations at JFK, opting to expand its Philadelphia hub instead.[24][25] JFK also serves as a major connecting point for other Oneworld carriers.[26]
One year later, there were 15 people working from Chesky and Gebbia's loft apartment on Rausch Street in San Francisco. To make room for employees, Brian Chesky gave up his bedroom and lived at lodging booked via the Airbnb service until the company moved into its first office space.[32][18] In April 2009, the company received $600,000 in seed money from Sequoia Capital[18] and, in November 2010, raised $7.2 million in financing from Greylock Partners and, again, from Sequoia Capital, in a Series A round, then announcing that out of 700,000 nights booked, 80% had occurred in the previous six months.[33]
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