The move was criticized by some rental hosts, stating it would deprive them of much needed income. These implementations were also criticized by the opposing Non-Partisan Association. Councillor George Affleck argued it was creating more bureaucracy, taxation and sticks, which was not solving the problem. He argued it made Vancouver a more difficult and costly place to live, also giving the opinion that more long term rental housing needs to be built. Airbnb's public policy manager for Canada welcomed the move of making short term rental legal, but criticized the ban on secondary suites from being rented. The company was also considering challenging the move, arguing that many family home spaces are saved for friends and relatives and would not be available for the long term rental market regardless.[174][175]
The Admirals Club was conceived by AA president C.R. Smith as a marketing promotion shortly after he was made an honorary Texas Ranger. Inspired by the Kentucky colonels and other honorary title designations, Smith decided to make particularly valued passengers "admirals" of the "Flagship fleet" (AA called its aircraft "Flagships" at the time).[50] The list of Admirals included many celebrities, politicians, and other VIPs, as well as more "ordinary" customers who had been particularly loyal to the airline.

The move was criticized by some rental hosts, stating it would deprive them of much needed income. These implementations were also criticized by the opposing Non-Partisan Association. Councillor George Affleck argued it was creating more bureaucracy, taxation and sticks, which was not solving the problem. He argued it made Vancouver a more difficult and costly place to live, also giving the opinion that more long term rental housing needs to be built. Airbnb's public policy manager for Canada welcomed the move of making short term rental legal, but criticized the ban on secondary suites from being rented. The company was also considering challenging the move, arguing that many family home spaces are saved for friends and relatives and would not be available for the long term rental market regardless.[174][175]
Airbnb uses drip pricing; when customers search for lodging, Airbnb displays per-night prices that exclude its service fees and the total charges are not revealed until the customer selects an individual property.[123] After a crackdown by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission in October 2015, users of Airbnb's Australian web site now see the total price of a stay including all unavoidable charges at every stage of the booking process.[124][125]
In December 2017, the City of Toronto under John Tory, adopted similar restrictions, banning homeowners from leasing their basements with separate entries and their other non-residential units for short term rentals, also arguing it was to protect the long term rental market. Government issued licensing and fees would also be required to hosts to continue to short term renting. The move was also criticized by some hosts who rely on Airbnb as a source of income; with one of them arguing the government's control over their property was like living in Stalin's era of the Soviet Union.[171] Airbnb responded in an open letter to the mayor and members of the City Council, welcoming fair competition but also made several arguments, including that Toronto's economy as a growing global hub also benefited from its listings. Many local residents depend on Airbnb for extra income and living expenses. The new economy evolved business and challenged the older business models and methods. Toronto, according to them, would benefit its reputation by adopting these newer business styles and ideas. It encouraged the city to continue to allow hosts to rent out their owned spaces, whether rooms in their house or in external spaces. All of this, according to Airbnb, brought about two hundred and ninety two million dollars into the city's economy.[172][173]
One year later, there were 15 people working from Chesky and Gebbia's loft apartment on Rausch Street in San Francisco. To make room for employees, Brian Chesky gave up his bedroom and lived at lodging booked via the Airbnb service until the company moved into its first office space.[32][18] In April 2009, the company received $600,000 in seed money from Sequoia Capital[18] and, in November 2010, raised $7.2 million in financing from Greylock Partners and, again, from Sequoia Capital, in a Series A round, then announcing that out of 700,000 nights booked, 80% had occurred in the previous six months.[33]
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