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It’s a nickname Isom likes, he told me last month at Skift Global Forum, because he believes D0 — that’s airline speak for flights that leave on time — is the most important metric for operations. He became animated speaking about the “choreography” required for punctual departures, from what happens at ticketing counters to fueling, catering, and cleaning.
Numerous North American cities have imposed restrictions on short-term housing rentals.[161][160] A 2016 Techdirt article reported that municipalities in the United States aiming to restrict Airbnb and its hosts would be in violation of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which does not allow prosecution of Internet-based platforms based on a user failing to comply with local laws.[162]
On June 3, 2016, American Airlines sought to register their 2013 logo with the United States Copyright Office.[65] However, in October of that year, the Copyright Office ruled that the logo was ineligible for copyright protection, as it did not pass the threshold of originality.[65] American submitted multiple requests for the Copyright Office to reconsider their determination. However, on January 8, 2018, the Copyright Office made a final decision that affirmed its initial determination that American's new logo was ineligible for copyright protection and is thus in the public domain.[65][66]
TSA Plans to Use More Biometrics at Airport Security Checkpoints: This may creep out some passengers, but it’s probably the right move. Facial scans don’t have a 100 percent success rate, but neither do humans. And facial scans are probably faster than today’s process, in which humans must check a face against an ID card or passport. Alan Levin of Bloomberg explains what TSA plans.
Shortly after moving to San Francisco in October 2007, roommates and former schoolmates Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia could not afford the rent for their loft apartment. Chesky and Gebbia came up with the idea of putting an air mattress in their living room and turning it into a bed and breakfast.[16][17] The goal at first was just "to make a few bucks".[18][19] In February 2008, Nathan Blecharczyk, Chesky's former roommate, joined as the Chief Technology Officer and the third co-founder of the new venture, which they named AirBed & Breakfast.[17][20] They put together a website which offered short-term living quarters, breakfast, and a unique business networking opportunity for those who were unable to book a hotel in the saturated market.[21] The site Airbedandbreakfast.com officially launched on August 11, 2008.[22][23] The founders had their first customers in town in the summer of 2008, during the Industrial Design Conference held by Industrial Designers Society of America, where travelers had a hard time finding lodging in the city.[17][24]
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