We also use git/github to facilitate the file updating process. We manually create and add new components to our master library Sketch file, and submit pull requests with a change log and generated png exports that document the changes. After that, the Sketch file ends up in to a shared Box folder, which is linked to Sketch templates, so everyone has access to the new components immediately.


Flight Attendants at American wholly owned Regional Carriers (Envoy – former American Eagle), Piedmont and PSA are all represented by Association of Flight Attendants – Communications Workers of America (AFA-CWA). USAirways Flight Attendants were active members of AFA-CWA prior to the merger. They are honorary lifetime members. AFA-CWA is the largest Flight Attendant Union in the industry and is operated by Flight Attendants.
On July 20, 2011, American announced an order for 460 narrowbody jets including 260 Airbus A320s.[34] The order broke Boeing's monopoly with the airline and forced Boeing into the re-engined 737 MAX.[35] As this sale included a Most-Favoured-Customer Clause, the European airframer has to refund any difference to American if it sells to another airline at a lower price, so Airbus can't give a competitive price to competitor United Airlines, leaving it to a Boeing-skewed fleet.[36]
Personal information submitted to us may be transferred to, stored and processed on servers located in various countries around the world, including the United States, in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. This may include transfers to American's affiliates and to third parties with whom we share personal information, as described in this Privacy Policy.
To help fund the site, the founders created special edition breakfast cereals, with presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain as the inspiration for "Obama O's" and "Cap'n McCains".[25] In two months, 800 boxes of cereal were sold at $40 each, which generated more than $30,000 for the company's incubation.[26][27] It also got the company noticed by computer programmer Paul Graham, who invited the founders to the January 2009 winter training session of his startup incubator, Y Combinator, which provided them with training and $20,000 in funding in exchange for a small interest in the company.[18][28][29] With the website already built, they used the $20,000 Y-Combinator investment to fly to New York City to meet users and promote the site.[30] They returned to San Francisco with a profitable business model to present to West Coast investors. By March 2009, the site had 10,000 users and 2,500 listings.[29]
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