American operates out of ten hubs located in Dallas/Fort Worth, Charlotte, Chicago–O'Hare, Philadelphia, Miami, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Washington–National, Los Angeles, New York–JFK, and New York–LaGuardia. American operates its primary maintenance base at Tulsa International Airport in addition to the maintenance locations located at its hubs. Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport is American Airlines’ largest passenger carrying hub, handling 51.1 million passengers annually with an average of 140,000 passengers daily. As of 2017, the company employs over 122,000 people.[7] Through the airline's parent company, American Airlines Group, it is publicly traded under NASDAQ: AAL with a market capitalization of about $25 billion as of 2017, and included in the S&P 500 index.[8]
Airbnb is a community marketplace that allows property owners and travelers to connect with each other for the purpose of renting unique vacation spaces around the world. The Airbnb community users’ activities are conducted on the company’s Website and through its iPhone and Android applications. The San Francisco-based Airbnb began operation in 2008 and currently has hundreds of employees across the globe supporting property rentals in nearly 25,000 cities in 192 countries.
Domestic American Airline flights span from coast to coast, and include flights to Alaska, Hawaii, and several United States territories as well. Most American flights arrive and depart from one of several hubs located across the country. The largest hub, by far, is the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), which handles several hundred flights every day. Other hubs for American include Chicago's O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Miami International Airport (MIA), and New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). They also consider New York's LaGuardia Airport (LGA) as a focus city, with more flights on the schedule to more destinations than a typical city would have, for the benefit of business travelers looking for tickets into the Big Apple.
One year later, there were 15 people working from Chesky and Gebbia's loft apartment on Rausch Street in San Francisco. To make room for employees, Brian Chesky gave up his bedroom and lived at lodging booked via the Airbnb service until the company moved into its first office space.[32][18] In April 2009, the company received $600,000 in seed money from Sequoia Capital[18] and, in November 2010, raised $7.2 million in financing from Greylock Partners and, again, from Sequoia Capital, in a Series A round, then announcing that out of 700,000 nights booked, 80% had occurred in the previous six months.[33]
Working in software development and design, we are often required to ship one-off solutions. Sometimes we’re working within time constraints and sometimes we just haven’t yet agreed upon a path forward. These one-off solutions aren’t inherently bad, but if they aren’t built upon a solid foundation, we eventually find ourselves having to pay back accrued technical and design debts.
To help fund the site, the founders created special edition breakfast cereals, with presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain as the inspiration for "Obama O's" and "Cap'n McCains".[25] In two months, 800 boxes of cereal were sold at $40 each, which generated more than $30,000 for the company's incubation.[26][27] It also got the company noticed by computer programmer Paul Graham, who invited the founders to the January 2009 winter training session of his startup incubator, Y Combinator, which provided them with training and $20,000 in funding in exchange for a small interest in the company.[18][28][29] With the website already built, they used the $20,000 Y-Combinator investment to fly to New York City to meet users and promote the site.[30] They returned to San Francisco with a profitable business model to present to West Coast investors. By March 2009, the site had 10,000 users and 2,500 listings.[29]
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