Miami – The fifth-largest hub in terms of number of flights and fourth-largest in number of destinations.[17] About 30 million passengers fly through MIA every year on American, which is about 79,000 people per day.[17] American has about 68% of the market share at Miami International, making it the largest airline at the airport.[17] Miami is American's primary South American and Caribbean gateway.[17]
Domestic American Airline flights span from coast to coast, and include flights to Alaska, Hawaii, and several United States territories as well. Most American flights arrive and depart from one of several hubs located across the country. The largest hub, by far, is the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), which handles several hundred flights every day. Other hubs for American include Chicago's O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Miami International Airport (MIA), and New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). They also consider New York's LaGuardia Airport (LGA) as a focus city, with more flights on the schedule to more destinations than a typical city would have, for the benefit of business travelers looking for tickets into the Big Apple.
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Airbnb is an American home rental platform based in San Francisco that lets people list, find, and rent short-term lodging in 65,000 cities and more than 191 countries across the globe. Founded in 2008 by Brian Chesky, Joe Gebbia, and Nathan Blecharczyk, it has done more than any other company to change the way people find places to stay away from home. In recent years, Airbnb has evolved its peer-to-peer model to give hosts the tech tools they need to run a seamless, sophisticated operation. More than 40% of Airbnb listings are now available via Instant Book, allowing guests to make reservations much as they would a hotel booking, and a new check-in tool automatically feeds arrival instructions to them via the app. The company has also expanded into Business Travel Ready listings, which offer travelers a designated work space, guaranteed Wi-Fi, and more. Now valued at $31 billion, the company is also helping travelers explore the world outside their rentals. In 2016, Airbnb launched Trips, a service that lures travelers out of their rentals for local tours and adventures in 20 countries and 30 cities around the globe. And in an effort to address humanitarian issues, Airbnb launched an Open Homes program in 2017 that allows hosts to offer housing to refugees, displaced travelers, and those seeking shelter after disasters. 

Domestic American Airline flights span from coast to coast, and include flights to Alaska, Hawaii, and several United States territories as well. Most American flights arrive and depart from one of several hubs located across the country. The largest hub, by far, is the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), which handles several hundred flights every day. Other hubs for American include Chicago's O'Hare International Airport (ORD), Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Miami International Airport (MIA), and New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). They also consider New York's LaGuardia Airport (LGA) as a focus city, with more flights on the schedule to more destinations than a typical city would have, for the benefit of business travelers looking for tickets into the Big Apple.


One year later, there were 15 people working from Chesky and Gebbia's loft apartment on Rausch Street in San Francisco. To make room for employees, Brian Chesky gave up his bedroom and lived at lodging booked via the Airbnb service until the company moved into its first office space.[32][18] In April 2009, the company received $600,000 in seed money from Sequoia Capital[18] and, in November 2010, raised $7.2 million in financing from Greylock Partners and, again, from Sequoia Capital, in a Series A round, then announcing that out of 700,000 nights booked, 80% had occurred in the previous six months.[33]
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