American operates out of ten hubs located in Dallas/Fort Worth, Charlotte, Chicago–O'Hare, Philadelphia, Miami, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Washington–National, Los Angeles, New York–JFK, and New York–LaGuardia. American operates its primary maintenance base at Tulsa International Airport in addition to the maintenance locations located at its hubs. Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport is American Airlines’ largest passenger carrying hub, handling 51.1 million passengers annually with an average of 140,000 passengers daily. As of 2017, the company employs over 122,000 people.[7] Through the airline's parent company, American Airlines Group, it is publicly traded under NASDAQ: AAL with a market capitalization of about $25 billion as of 2017, and included in the S&P 500 index.[8]
Washington–National – The seventh-largest hub for American in terms of number of destinations and flights and American's third hub for the East Coast. The airport also serves as a base for American Airlines Shuttle.[20] About 12 million passengers fly through DCA on American every year, or about 33,000 people per day.[20] American has about 49% of the market share at DCA, making it the largest carrier at the airport.[20]
If you’re a music buff, you probably already realize that no self-respecting music fan would miss a trip to Music City. We’ve got a Nashville, TN hotel that suits any traveler’s budget, and if you’d like to check out Dollywood, we’ve got you covered with motels in the Pigeon Forge mountains. If you haven’t gotten your fill of peaks, venture out to our Gatlinburg Hotels in the beautiful Smoky Mountains.
Numerous North American cities have imposed restrictions on short-term housing rentals.[161][160] A 2016 Techdirt article reported that municipalities in the United States aiming to restrict Airbnb and its hosts would be in violation of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which does not allow prosecution of Internet-based platforms based on a user failing to comply with local laws.[162]

In August 2017, Airbnb cancelled numerous bookings and closed accounts belonging to attendees of the white nationalist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, citing its community standards user agreement to "accept people regardless of their race, religion, national origin, ethnicity, disability, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, or age."[151]
One year later, there were 15 people working from Chesky and Gebbia's loft apartment on Rausch Street in San Francisco. To make room for employees, Brian Chesky gave up his bedroom and lived at lodging booked via the Airbnb service until the company moved into its first office space.[32][18] In April 2009, the company received $600,000 in seed money from Sequoia Capital[18] and, in November 2010, raised $7.2 million in financing from Greylock Partners and, again, from Sequoia Capital, in a Series A round, then announcing that out of 700,000 nights booked, 80% had occurred in the previous six months.[33]
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