Hugo Martin covers the travel industries, including airlines and theme parks, and writes the weekly Travel Briefcase column for the Business section. A native Californian, Martin was part of the Metro staff that won three Pulitzer Prizes in 1993, 1995 and 1998. He was also on the Travel section staff that won the Lowell Thomas Award from the Society of American Travel Writers in 2008. He is an avid outdoorsman, gardener and Lakers fan.
Numerous North American cities have imposed restrictions on short-term housing rentals.[161][160] A 2016 Techdirt article reported that municipalities in the United States aiming to restrict Airbnb and its hosts would be in violation of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which does not allow prosecution of Internet-based platforms based on a user failing to comply with local laws.[162]
In February 2011, Airbnb announced its millionth night booked.[34][35] In January 2012, the company announced its five millionth night booked.[36] In June 2012, Airbnb announced 10 million nights booked, doubling business in the previous five months.[37][38] Of these bookings, 75% of the business came from markets outside of the continental United States.
If your trip includes stargazing in the “City of Angels,” you’ll want to explore the boutique hotels that make the city unique. “What is a boutique hotel?” you may ask. It’s a small, fashionable accommodation in an urban area. You can splurge on any of ours, or opt for one of our many cheap hotels in Los Angeles, so you can save your money for the food that makes LA famous. 

Some cities have restrictions on subletting for a short period of time. Airbnb has published a list of regulations and requirements for cities in the United States. In some cities, collection of a transient occupancy tax by Airbnb is required. In many cities, hosts must register with the government and obtain a permit or license.[9] Landlords or community associations may have restrictions on short-term sublets.
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