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• Boeing 777-300ER: Fully lie-flat Cirrus seats manufactured by Zodiac Seats UK, designed by JPA Design for Cathay Pacific, and licensed from Cathay Pacific with direct aisle access in a 1-2-1 reverse herringbone configuration. Seat length: 76-80 inches (193–203 cm). Equipped with a 15.4-inch(39 cm) inch touchscreen monitor, one universal AC power outlet, and USB ports.[2]

American is one of the nation's leading airlines in flights to international destinations. AA Airlines flies to several countries in South America, including Brazil, Colombia, Argentina, and Peru. Through their hub in Dallas, American dominates the travel market to Central America, with service to almost every country between Mexico and Colombia. European service is anchored by American's oneworld partners, with American Airlines flights to the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain and other countries supplemented with seasonal service to countries like Norway and Sweden. American also serves Asia with flights to Shanghai and Beijing in China; Nagoya, Osaka, and Tokyo in Japan, and several additional nations.

New York–JFK – The tenth-largest hub for American in terms of number of flights, the ninth-largest in number of destinations and American's secondary East Coast hub for international flights.[23] About 7 million passengers fly through JFK on American every year, or about 19,000 people per day.[23] American has about 12% of the market share at JFK, making it the third-largest carrier at the airport behind Delta and JetBlue.[23] Since 2017, American has been reducing its international operations at JFK, opting to expand its Philadelphia hub instead.[24][25] JFK also serves as a major connecting point for other Oneworld carriers.[26]

In November 2017, the Government of Vancouver, Canada adopted regulations and restrictions against Airbnb hosting, claiming to protect the long term rental market which it stated was just above zero availability. The new regulations include allowing hosts to be allowed only to rent their principal residence. Hosts would also require a paid license with acquisition and maintenance fees, with a number to be displayed when listing any space for rent. A voluntary transaction fee of three percent was also to be implemented per reservation, but Airbnb claimed it was unable to collect such fees, instead requesting an amendment for the hotel tax.[174][175]
Shortly after moving to San Francisco in October 2007, roommates and former schoolmates Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia could not afford the rent for their loft apartment. Chesky and Gebbia came up with the idea of putting an air mattress in their living room and turning it into a bed and breakfast.[16][17] The goal at first was just "to make a few bucks".[18][19] In February 2008, Nathan Blecharczyk, Chesky's former roommate, joined as the Chief Technology Officer and the third co-founder of the new venture, which they named AirBed & Breakfast.[17][20] They put together a website which offered short-term living quarters, breakfast, and a unique business networking opportunity for those who were unable to book a hotel in the saturated market.[21] The site Airbedandbreakfast.com officially launched on August 11, 2008.[22][23] The founders had their first customers in town in the summer of 2008, during the Industrial Design Conference held by Industrial Designers Society of America, where travelers had a hard time finding lodging in the city.[17][24]
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