Downtown Dallas is the center of the city’s electrifying urban energy. Stay here for classic Texas steakhouses, late-night live music bars where beats blast out of the doors, and the West End historic district - a shopping, entertainment, and restaurant area with an old-world vibe. If you’re serious about shopping, stay in flashy Uptown, where you can buy anything from hand-crafted cowboy boots to designer clothing. Trendsetters and bohemian artists should stay in Oak Cliff, a chilled-out suburb that sings with vintage clothing stores, ultra-hip cafes, and artisan restaurants. But if you’re traveling with the family, the easy-going green-washed area of East Dallas is ideal.

Categories: 2008 establishments in CaliforniaCompanies based in San FranciscoCompanies established in 2008Hospitality companies of the United StatesMultilingual websitesOnline marketplaces of the United StatesPeer-to-peerPrivately held companies in the United StatesReal estate services companies of the United StatesSocial networking websitesSharing economySocial planning websitesTravel websitesVacation rentalY Combinator companies
Start your bright Dallas day by taking a cool morning walk around the Arboretum and Botanical Gardens in East Dallas. This eden-like lakeside stretch of swaying trees and vibrant exotic flowers - leading to the historic Spanish-style DeGolyer House - will put you in a tranquil mood, perfect for touring the city’s galleries. Head to the Dallas Museum of Art, which boasts a collection that spans from the 3rd millennium BC to the present day, including Ancient Roman sarcophagi and surreal Van Gogh paintings. If you’re traveling with the family, check out the magical dinosaur and mega mammoth skeletons at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science, or say hello to the majestic lions and cheeky chimpanzees at the Dallas Zoo. Cap off your day with some Dallas history and heritage at the Sixth Floor Museum, a touching and unforgettable exhibition dedicated to John F. Kennedy.
In the late 1960s, American commissioned designer Massimo Vignelli to develop a new livery. The original design called for a red, white, and blue stripe on the fuselage, and a simple "AA" logo, without an eagle, on the tail; instead, Vignelli created a highly stylized eagle, which remained the company's logo until 2013. In 1999, American painted a new Boeing 757 (N679AN) in its 1959 international orange livery. One Boeing 777 and one Boeing 757 were painted in standard livery with a pink ribbon on the sides and on the tail, in support of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. One Boeing 757 is painted with a yellow ribbon on the tailfin on the aircraft and on the side of the body says "Flagship Freedom". American Eagle, the airline's regional airline has the same special livery on ERJ-145 aircraft.
""Stopped by the Hedley Club Lounge Saturday after the Sharks Game. What a fabulous surprise! a great combo playing old school smooth jazz. A relaxing venue by the fireplace with pleasant surroundings and comfortable accommodations. A real winner in downtown San Jose. Best cocktail lounge in the area. Beats the noise and crowds at the nearby venues.""
The move was criticized by some rental hosts, stating it would deprive them of much needed income. These implementations were also criticized by the opposing Non-Partisan Association. Councillor George Affleck argued it was creating more bureaucracy, taxation and sticks, which was not solving the problem. He argued it made Vancouver a more difficult and costly place to live, also giving the opinion that more long term rental housing needs to be built. Airbnb's public policy manager for Canada welcomed the move of making short term rental legal, but criticized the ban on secondary suites from being rented. The company was also considering challenging the move, arguing that many family home spaces are saved for friends and relatives and would not be available for the long term rental market regardless.[174][175]

Instead of relying on individual atoms, we started considering our components as elements of a living organism. They have a function and personality, are defined by a set of properties, can co-exists with others and can evolve independently. A unified design language should not just be a set of static rules and individual atoms, but an evolving ecosystem.
American's economy plus product (not to be confused with premium economy), Main Cabin Extra, is available on most of the mainline fleet and American Eagle regional aircraft with more than 50 seats. Exceptions include a majority of former US Airways aircraft (as of May 2014), US Airways Express regional aircraft, and a handful of 777-200ERs that have yet to be retrofitted. Seats range from 17.2–19.5 inches (44–47 cm) in width and have 34–38 inches (86–97 cm) of pitch, which is 5–6 more inches of pitch offered in regular economy seating.[38] American retained Main Cabin Extra when the new Premium Economy product entered service in late 2016.[40]
American Airlines allows pets to travel on most flights less than 12 hours. Pets may travel in the cabin for a fee of $125 per kennel per way. The animal must be at least eight weeks old and must stay in the kennel under the seat in front of you. Kennels may not exceed 19x13x9 inches, and pets should be able to stand up and move around comfortably.

Miles can be redeemed for a variety of benefits and privileges, including award travel and flight upgrades. Use the miles to book a trip or move up to the next cabin class on most domestic and international flights. Members can even redeem the miles for car rentals, hotels stays, and vacations in over 500 destinations around the world. Miles can also be donated or used for magazine and newspaper subscriptions, gift cards, or identity theft protection.
To help fund the site, the founders created special edition breakfast cereals, with presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain as the inspiration for "Obama O's" and "Cap'n McCains".[25] In two months, 800 boxes of cereal were sold at $40 each, which generated more than $30,000 for the company's incubation.[26][27] It also got the company noticed by computer programmer Paul Graham, who invited the founders to the January 2009 winter training session of his startup incubator, Y Combinator, which provided them with training and $20,000 in funding in exchange for a small interest in the company.[18][28][29] With the website already built, they used the $20,000 Y-Combinator investment to fly to New York City to meet users and promote the site.[30] They returned to San Francisco with a profitable business model to present to West Coast investors. By March 2009, the site had 10,000 users and 2,500 listings.[29]
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