Chicago–O'Hare – The third-largest hub for American in terms of number of flights and American's primary hub for the Midwest.[15] About 28 million passengers fly on American through O'Hare every year, or about 77,000 people per day.[15] American has about 35% of the market share at O'Hare making it the airport's second-largest airline after United.[15]
AARP and its affiliates do not provide retail goods or services or discounts on such goods or services. All goods or services and discounts offered via the AARP® Travel Center powered by Expedia®, are provided by third-party suppliers. AARP and its affiliates do not endorse and are not responsible for the goods or services and discounts made available on this site. Offers are subject to change and may have restrictions. Please contact the AARP Travel Center directly for full details. Expedia pays a royalty fee to AARP for the use of AARP's intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP.
Miami – The fifth-largest hub in terms of number of flights and fourth-largest in number of destinations.[17] About 30 million passengers fly through MIA every year on American, which is about 79,000 people per day.[17] American has about 68% of the market share at Miami International, making it the largest airline at the airport.[17] Miami is American's primary South American and Caribbean gateway.[17]
American is one of the nation's leading airlines in flights to international destinations. AA Airlines flies to several countries in South America, including Brazil, Colombia, Argentina, and Peru. Through their hub in Dallas, American dominates the travel market to Central America, with service to almost every country between Mexico and Colombia. European service is anchored by American's oneworld partners, with American Airlines flights to the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain and other countries supplemented with seasonal service to countries like Norway and Sweden. American also serves Asia with flights to Shanghai and Beijing in China; Nagoya, Osaka, and Tokyo in Japan, and several additional nations.
To help fund the site, the founders created special edition breakfast cereals, with presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain as the inspiration for "Obama O's" and "Cap'n McCains".[25] In two months, 800 boxes of cereal were sold at $40 each, which generated more than $30,000 for the company's incubation.[26][27] It also got the company noticed by computer programmer Paul Graham, who invited the founders to the January 2009 winter training session of his startup incubator, Y Combinator, which provided them with training and $20,000 in funding in exchange for a small interest in the company.[18][28][29] With the website already built, they used the $20,000 Y-Combinator investment to fly to New York City to meet users and promote the site.[30] They returned to San Francisco with a profitable business model to present to West Coast investors. By March 2009, the site had 10,000 users and 2,500 listings.[29]
×