Right now, as you read this, thousands of people are enjoying the rooms they booked at Hotels.com. That’s a thought that makes us smile. It’s reason enough to come in to work every day. But luckily for us, it isn’t the only reason. Hotels.com is a global company with the spirit of a start-up. Our people are experts in their fields but there are no big egos here. Collaboration is in. Red tape and politics are out. Let your guard down. Relax. Have fun. You’re in good hands now.
We are a small but growing company within Expedia Group and one of the premier eCommerce sites focused exclusively on the car rental experience. We offer a unique opportunity to work in a start-up environment backed by the resources, benefits, and network of a multi-national travel group. We’re looking for Owners who aren’t afraid to dive-in and tackle problems hands-on. People who want to use data and the scientific method to drive decisions. Doers with the passion and drive to take our business to the next level. Sound like you? Get behind the wheel and let’s go!

We want you for you. Not the future you, or the after training you. We want the passionate and ambitious you of today, what you can bring to the table right now. And of course, we can't wait to meet the future you too. Once you're here, you'll discover a world of passionate people who work as One Team and use technology to improve the travel experience for millions of travelers across the world.
Working in software development and design, we are often required to ship one-off solutions. Sometimes we’re working within time constraints and sometimes we just haven’t yet agreed upon a path forward. These one-off solutions aren’t inherently bad, but if they aren’t built upon a solid foundation, we eventually find ourselves having to pay back accrued technical and design debts.

To help fund the site, the founders created special edition breakfast cereals, with presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain as the inspiration for "Obama O's" and "Cap'n McCains".[25] In two months, 800 boxes of cereal were sold at $40 each, which generated more than $30,000 for the company's incubation.[26][27] It also got the company noticed by computer programmer Paul Graham, who invited the founders to the January 2009 winter training session of his startup incubator, Y Combinator, which provided them with training and $20,000 in funding in exchange for a small interest in the company.[18][28][29] With the website already built, they used the $20,000 Y-Combinator investment to fly to New York City to meet users and promote the site.[30] They returned to San Francisco with a profitable business model to present to West Coast investors. By March 2009, the site had 10,000 users and 2,500 listings.[29]
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