Categories: 2008 establishments in CaliforniaCompanies based in San FranciscoCompanies established in 2008Hospitality companies of the United StatesMultilingual websitesOnline marketplaces of the United StatesPeer-to-peerPrivately held companies in the United StatesReal estate services companies of the United StatesSocial networking websitesSharing economySocial planning websitesTravel websitesVacation rentalY Combinator companies
The European Union (EU) warned member states against banning sharing businesses like Airbnb and Uber, stating that outright bans should be used only as a last resort to attain public interest and that governments should instead implement more moderate regulations, which the sharing companies have had to navigate through.[157][158] The European Commission advocated the EU's guidelines on regulating sharing businesses companies and warned that they were pulling massive revenues generated estimated at around 28 billion Euros across Europe.[159]
Right from day one you realize you are part of a great team. Everyone is pulling in the same direction and striving to innovate and move things forward. Every idea is considered and encouraged and this leads to highly collaborative culture. Hotels.com has the feeling of a start-up but with the structure and maturity of a large multinational company.
""Stopped by the Hedley Club Lounge Saturday after the Sharks Game. What a fabulous surprise! a great combo playing old school smooth jazz. A relaxing venue by the fireplace with pleasant surroundings and comfortable accommodations. A real winner in downtown San Jose. Best cocktail lounge in the area. Beats the noise and crowds at the nearby venues.""
In November 2017, the Government of Vancouver, Canada adopted regulations and restrictions against Airbnb hosting, claiming to protect the long term rental market which it stated was just above zero availability. The new regulations include allowing hosts to be allowed only to rent their principal residence. Hosts would also require a paid license with acquisition and maintenance fees, with a number to be displayed when listing any space for rent. A voluntary transaction fee of three percent was also to be implemented per reservation, but Airbnb claimed it was unable to collect such fees, instead requesting an amendment for the hotel tax.[174][175]

On June 3, 2016, American Airlines sought to register their 2013 logo with the United States Copyright Office.[65] However, in October of that year, the Copyright Office ruled that the logo was ineligible for copyright protection, as it did not pass the threshold of originality.[65] American submitted multiple requests for the Copyright Office to reconsider their determination. However, on January 8, 2018, the Copyright Office made a final decision that affirmed its initial determination that American's new logo was ineligible for copyright protection and is thus in the public domain.[65][66]
One year later, there were 15 people working from Chesky and Gebbia's loft apartment on Rausch Street in San Francisco. To make room for employees, Brian Chesky gave up his bedroom and lived at lodging booked via the Airbnb service until the company moved into its first office space.[32][18] In April 2009, the company received $600,000 in seed money from Sequoia Capital[18] and, in November 2010, raised $7.2 million in financing from Greylock Partners and, again, from Sequoia Capital, in a Series A round, then announcing that out of 700,000 nights booked, 80% had occurred in the previous six months.[33]
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