The Admirals Club was conceived by AA president C.R. Smith as a marketing promotion shortly after he was made an honorary Texas Ranger. Inspired by the Kentucky colonels and other honorary title designations, Smith decided to make particularly valued passengers "admirals" of the "Flagship fleet" (AA called its aircraft "Flagships" at the time).[50] The list of Admirals included many celebrities, politicians, and other VIPs, as well as more "ordinary" customers who had been particularly loyal to the airline.


TSA Plans to Use More Biometrics at Airport Security Checkpoints: This may creep out some passengers, but it’s probably the right move. Facial scans don’t have a 100 percent success rate, but neither do humans. And facial scans are probably faster than today’s process, in which humans must check a face against an ID card or passport. Alan Levin of Bloomberg explains what TSA plans.
Dallas/Fort Worth – American's primary hub, and its largest hub in terms of daily flights and number of destinations and American's primary hub for the South.[13] American currently has about 84% of the market share and flies approximately 57 million passengers through DFW every year, which is about 156,000 people per day making it the busiest airline at the airport.[13] American's corporate headquarters are also in Fort Worth near the airport.[13] DFW serves as American's primary gateway to Mexico, and secondary gateway to Latin America.[13]
At Expedia, we never stand still. Now we're expanding our Lodging Partner Services division –LPS for short. Right now we're investing in LPS, taking on new people in our Global Market Management and Partner Account Management teams. We're the people that find, sign up, onboard, market, and support the hundreds of thousands of hotels across the world on which our business relies. Without us, there'd be no Expedia.
The Resilience of the American Vacation in Mexico: This excellent enterprise piece from Skift’s Sarah Enelow-Synder is not about airlines, though the Mexican carrier Volaris figures prominently. Holger Blankenstein, who runs the airline’s commercial team, explains why marketing to Mexican-Americans is different from targeting vacationers. “In a Mexican-origin family, the son or daughter are the ones who buy the flight ticket for the parents,” he said. “How the family gets to know Volaris and the brand is passed down from generation to generation.”
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Allemansrätten – or the freedom to roam – is a principle protected by Swedish law that gives all people the right to be free in Swedish nature. In other words, Swedish nature isn’t just a piece of land with trees and lakes and cliffs – it’s a home with all the necessities and amenities that any great home should have. It’s a place where you can eat berries from the ground, sleep under the stars, swim in the lakes and roam freely. To make this home available for everyone, Sweden has listed the entire country on Airbnb.
American will add a sixth destination in Cuba with a new daily flight from Miami International Airport (MIA) to Antonio Maceo Airport (SCU) in Santiago de Cuba starting May 3. The airline will also start new service from Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to Durango International Airport (DGO) in Mexico starting June 6. American will be the only U.S. carrier to serve DGO and SCU.
Shortly after moving to San Francisco in October 2007, roommates and former schoolmates Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia could not afford the rent for their loft apartment. Chesky and Gebbia came up with the idea of putting an air mattress in their living room and turning it into a bed and breakfast.[16][17] The goal at first was just "to make a few bucks".[18][19] In February 2008, Nathan Blecharczyk, Chesky's former roommate, joined as the Chief Technology Officer and the third co-founder of the new venture, which they named AirBed & Breakfast.[17][20] They put together a website which offered short-term living quarters, breakfast, and a unique business networking opportunity for those who were unable to book a hotel in the saturated market.[21] The site Airbedandbreakfast.com officially launched on August 11, 2008.[22][23] The founders had their first customers in town in the summer of 2008, during the Industrial Design Conference held by Industrial Designers Society of America, where travelers had a hard time finding lodging in the city.[17][24]
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